The prevalence of fungi on groupers (Epinephelus sp.) in cage mariculture systems of the northern coast of Surabaya, East Java

E. Yuliastuti, R. Kusdawarti, Sudarno

Research output: Contribution to journalConference articlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Groupers are marine fish that live on coral reefs. These fish have a high economic value and the potential to be developed in Indonesia. To support the production of groupers in Indonesia, seeding is very important. However, many obstacles must be faced in the maintenance of grouper fingerlings. One disease that is a problem in fish farming is mycosis diseases caused by fungi. Fungi are quickly transmitted to other fish in the same pond. They spread quickly and can potentially cause substantial losses for farmers and fishermen alike. The purpose of this study was to determine the type of fungi that can be isolated and identified from the groupers and whether there are fungi that have the potential to cause disease in the groupers. The results of this research indicate that out of all of the isolated fungi, it was found that Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium glabrum have a prevalence of 20%, 10% and 10%. The conclusion of the research is that fungi can be found in groupers (Epinephelus sp.) at the Mariculture Cages System in Surabaya, East Java, and that the types found were Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium glabrum specifically. The fungi that have the potential to cause disease in groupers (Epinephelus spj are Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus niger.

Original languageEnglish
Article number012007
JournalIOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science
Volume236
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2019
Event1st International Conference on Fisheries and Marine Science, InCoFiMS 2018 - East Java, Indonesia
Duration: 6 Oct 2018 → …

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The prevalence of fungi on groupers (Epinephelus sp.) in cage mariculture systems of the northern coast of Surabaya, East Java'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this