The Javanese Cultural Beliefs and Practices Among Patients With End-Stage Renal Disease Undergoing Hemodialysis

Ira Suarilah, Ika Yuni Widyawati, Khotibul Umam, Chiu Chu Lin, Rini Purwanti, Supriyono Supriyono, Klaus Mundt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Poor prognosis and higher mortality of chronic kidney disease are linked with cultural beliefs and practices. This study explored cultural beliefs and practices of Javanese people with end-stage renal disease undergoing hemodialysis for ≥5 years. Methods: A qualitative narrative inquiry was applied in this study. Data were collected through in-depth narrative interviews, followed by text messages, calls, and audio-visual calls for 6 weeks. Results: There were 14 participants; their mean age was 51.15 years and hemodialysis duration was 5 years and 2 months up to 10 years and 9 months. Four themes emerged: life-and-death acceptance, expectation of end-of-life care, contemplation of withdrawal from hemodialysis, and wishing for a good death. Discussion: Life values guided the ability to survive for the individual. Adherence to renal disease management regimen clashed with cultural values on occasions, such as social gatherings. Therefore, the unmet needs of patients should be addressed with a transcultural approach to modify personal health behaviors.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Transcultural Nursing
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2024

Keywords

  • culture
  • end-of-life
  • end-stage renal disease
  • health service
  • hemodialysis
  • Java
  • life expectancy

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