The effect of murottal auditory therapy on anxiety and comfort levels in patients with cardiovascular disease

Indah Sri Wahyuningsih, Tintin Sukartini, Yulis Setiya Dewi, Ahmad Ikhlasul Amal, Monaleta Liska Kismana

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Patients with cardiovascular disease often experience anxiety and discomfort, which can negatively affect their outcomes. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of murottal auditory therapy on anxiety and comfort levels in hospitalized patients with cardiovascular disease. This quasi-experimental study included 45 patients in both the intervention and control groups, selected through purposive sampling. Participants met criteria such as consciousness, effective communication skills, Muslim faith, and no hearing impairments. Anxiety was assessed using the Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale, while comfort was evaluated with the General Comfort Questionnaire. The Mc Nemar test was employed to determine the effect of the intervention. The findings indicate that a substantial number of patients in the intervention group reported mild anxiety (91.1%) and increased comfort (95.6%) following murottal therapy. Significant differences in anxiety and comfort levels were observed between the control and intervention groups, with p-values of 0.004 and 0.000, respectively. In conclusion, murottal auditory therapy, specifically Surah Ar-Rahman, effectively reduces anxiety and enhances comfort among patients with cardiovascular disease. These results underscore the potential of murottal auditory therapy as a complementary approach to expedite patients’ recovery during treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Article number11816
JournalHealthcare in Low-Resource Settings
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Apr 2024

Keywords

  • anxiety level
  • cardiovascular disease
  • comfort
  • murottal auditory therapy

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The effect of murottal auditory therapy on anxiety and comfort levels in patients with cardiovascular disease'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this