Religiously permissible consumption: The influence of the halal label on product perceptions depending on the centrality of religiosity

Dominika Maison, Marta Marchlewska, Rizqy Amelia Zein, Dewi Syarifah, Herison Purba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of the halal label on product perceptions among Muslims high (vs low) in the centrality of their religion. Design/methodology/approach: It was hypothesized that a halal label would predict positive product perceptions, especially among those Muslims who scored high in the Centrality of Religiosity Scale (CRS). The study was conducted among 187 Muslims in Indonesia, a country in which Islam is the dominant religion. We used an experimental design where two products (cake and energy drink), with (n = 85) or without (n = 102) the halal label (depending on the experimental condition), were displayed. The participants were randomly assigned to the research conditions. Following product exposure, the participants evaluated products on perception scales (e.g. tasty, healthy). Finally, the centrality of religiosity (moderator variable) was measured. Findings: The results of the analysis showed that the halal label increased positive product perceptions among those Muslims who scored high in the CRS. A similar pattern of results was obtained for both products (cake and energy drink), though the described effect was even more pronounced in the case of the energy drink. Originality/value: Results shed light on the role of religiosity in consumption, especially in consumers’ responses to the halal label.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)948-960
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Islamic Marketing
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Sept 2019

Keywords

  • Centrality of religiosity
  • Consumer behaviour
  • Halal certification
  • Product perceptions

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