Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) correlates with total and direct bilirubin in chronic hepatitis b patients with/without cirrhosis

Arum Tri Wahyuningsih, Fuad Anshori, Yessy Puspitasari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio (NLR) is considered as an important but inexpensive biomarker for inflammation in chronic hepatitis B patients. Cirrhosis increases bilirubin levels, suggesting severe liver dysfunction. This study aimed to investigate the correlation between NLR and liver function tests (LFT) in chronic hepatitis B patients with/without cirrhosis. This cross-sectional study included 36 patients with chronic hepatitis B with and without cirrhosis. The LFT results, neutrophil, and lymphocyte count were recorded and calculated. Mann-Whitney and Spearman correlation analyses were performed in both groups. A significant relationship was found between NLR and both total and direct bilirubin (r=0.35; p=0.035; and r=0.428; p=0.009). Significant differences between the two groups were found in total (p=0.01) and direct (p=0.10) bilirubin levels. The HBV-DNA was significantly positively correlated with ALT (r=0.33; p=0.047). The NLR is significantly associated with total and direct bilirubin.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1021-1027
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Medicinal and Pharmaceutical Chemistry Research
Volume6
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2024

Keywords

  • Bilirubin
  • cirrhosis
  • hepatitis B
  • neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR)

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