Minimally Invasive Neuroendoscopic Surgery for Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage: A Review of the Rationale and Associated Complications

Arie Ibrahim, Muhammad Reza Arifianto, Asra Al Fauzi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is associated with a poor prognosis. Its mortality rate exceeds 40%, and 10–15% of survivors remain fully dependent. Considering the limited number of effective therapeutic options in such cases, the possibilities for surgical interventions aimed at removal of a hematoma should always be borne in mind. Although conventional surgery for deep-seated ICH has failed to show an improvement in outcomes, use of minimally invasive techniques—in particular, neuroendoscopic procedures—may be more effective and has demonstrated promising results. Although there are certain risks of morbidities (including rebleeding, epilepsy, meningitis, infection, pneumonia, and digestive tract disorders) and a nonnegligible risk of mortality, their incidence rates after neuroendoscopic evacuation of ICH compare favorably with those after conventional surgery. Prevention of complications requires careful postoperative surveillance of the patient and, preferably, treatment in a neurointensive care unit, as well as early detection and appropriate management of associated comorbidities.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationActa Neurochirurgica, Supplementum
PublisherSpringer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbH
Pages103-108
Number of pages6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2023

Publication series

NameActa Neurochirurgica, Supplementum
Volume130
ISSN (Print)0065-1419
ISSN (Electronic)2197-8395

Keywords

  • Complication
  • Endoscopic neurosurgery
  • Minimally invasive neurosurgery
  • Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage

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