Identification of PB2 mutations responsible for the efficient replication of H5N1 influenza viruses in human lung epithelial cells

Reina Yamaji, Shinya Yamada, Mai Q. Le, Chengjun Li, Hualan Chen, Ema Qurnianingsih, Chairul A. Nidom, Mutsumi Ito, Yuko Sakai-Tagawa, Yoshihiro Kawaoka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza viruses have caused outbreaks among poultry worldwide, resulting in sporadic infections in humans with approximately 60% mortality. However, efficient transmission of H5N1 viruses among humans has yet to occur, suggesting that further adaptation of H5N1 viruses to humans is required for their efficient transmission among humans. The viral determinants for efficient replication in humans are currently poorly understood. Here, we report that the polymerase PB2 protein of an H5N1 influenza virus isolated from a human in Vietnam (A/Vietnam/UT36285/2010, virus 36285) increased the growth ability of an avian H5N1 virus (A/wild bird/Anhui/82/2005, virus Wb/AH82) in human lung epithelial A549 cells (however, the reassortant virus did not replicate more efficiently than human 36285 virus). Furthermore, we demonstrate that the amino acid residues at positions 249, 309, and 339 of the PB2 protein from this human isolate were responsible for its efficient replication in A549 cells. PB2 residues 249G and 339M, which are found in the human H5N1 virus, are rare in H5N1 viruses from both human and avian sources. Interestingly, PB2-249G is found in over 30% of human seasonal H3N2 viruses, which suggests that H5N1 viruses may replicate well in human cells when they acquire this mutation. Our data are of value to H5N1 virus surveillance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3947-3956
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Virology
Volume89
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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