Human bony labyrinth is an indicator of population history and dispersal from Africa

Marcia S. Ponce de León, Toetik Koesbardiati, John David Weissmann, Marco Milella, Carlos S. Reyna-Blanco, Gen Suwa, Osamu Kondo, Anna Sapfo Malaspinas, Tim D. White, Christoph P.E. Zollikofer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The dispersal of modern humans from Africa is now well documented with genetic data that track population history, as well as gene flow between populations. Phenetic skeletal data, such as cranial and pelvic morphologies, also exhibit a dispersal-from-Africa signal, which, however, tends to be blurred by the effects of local adaptation and in vivo phenotypic plasticity, and that is often deteriorated by postmortem damage to skeletal remains. These complexities raise the question of which skeletal structures most effectively track neutral population history. The cavity system of the inner ear (the so-called bony labyrinth) is a good candidate structure for such analyses. It is already fully formed by birth, which minimizes postnatal phenotypic plasticity, and it is generally well preserved in archaeological samples. Here we use morphometric data of the bony labyrinth to show that it is a surprisingly good marker of the global dispersal of modern humans from Africa. Labyrinthine morphology tracks genetic distances and geography in accordance with an isolation-by-distance model with dispersal from Africa. Our data further indicate that the neutral-like pattern of variation is compatible with stabilizing selection on labyrinth morphology. Given the increasingly important role of the petrous bone for ancient DNA recovery from archaeological specimens, we encourage researchers to acquire 3D morphological data of the inner ear structures before any invasive sampling. Such data will constitute an important archive of phenotypic variation in present and past populations, and will permit individual-based genotype–phenotype comparisons.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4128-4133
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume115
Issue number16
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Apr 2018

Keywords

  • Bony labyrinth
  • Human dispersals
  • Morphometrics
  • Stabilizing selection

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