Dissonance in views between healthcare professionals and adults with a spinal cord injury with their understanding and interpretation of exercise intensity for exercise prescription

Kung Su Jung, Mike J. Hutchinson, Chayaporn Chotiyarnwong, Martha K. Kusumawardani, Seung Hyun Yoon, Yukio Mikami, Phairin Laohasinnarong, Damayanti Tinduh, Pannika Prachgosin, Inggar Narasinta, Pojchong Chotiyarnwong, Ditaruni A. Utami, Yasonori Umemoto, Fumihiro Tajima, Vicky L. Goosey-Tolfrey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives To evaluate the difference between healthcare professionals (HCPs) and adults with spinal cord injury (SCI) in Asia regarding knowledge and interpretation of 'exercise intensity' for aerobic exercise prescription. Methods and study design A survey was distributed to practising HCP and adults with SCI. It was completed in participants' local language on topics related to the importance of exercise frequency, intensity, time and type; methods for monitoring and terms related to exercise intensity prescription. χ 2 analysis was used to detect differences in HCP or those with SCI. Results 121 HCP and 107 adults with an SCI ≥1 years (C1-L4) participated. Responses revealed 61% of all HCP ranked 'intensity' being most important whereas only 38% respondents from the SCI group ranked it as high importance (p=0.008). For those with SCI, 'frequency' was most important (61%) which was significantly higher than the 45% selected by HCPs (p=0.030). Of the 228 respondents on average only 34% believed that the terms, 'moderate' and 'vigorous' provided enough information for aerobic exercise intensity prescription. HCP most often used HR methods compared with the SCI group (90% vs 54%; p<0.01). Both groups frequently used the subjective measures of exercise intensity, for example, Ratings of Perceived Exertion (8%3 vs 76% for HCP and SCI), HCP also frequently used speed (81%) and SCI also frequently relied on 'the affect' or feelings while exercising (69%). Conclusions These differences must be considered when developing clinical-practice exercise guidelines and health referral educational pathways for adults with SCI in Asia.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberbmjsem-2022-001487
JournalBMJ Open Sport and Exercise Medicine
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 9 Mar 2023

Keywords

  • exercise rehabilitation
  • exercise testing
  • wheelchair

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