Detection and prevalence of multidrug-resistant klebsiella pneumoniae strains isolated from poultry farms in Blitar, Indonesia

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34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Antibiotics are commonly used as therapy and disease control in humans and animals. However, the widespread use of antibiotics may also trigger the rise of antibiotic resistance. Therefore, the aim of this study was to study the occurrence of Multidrug-Resistant (MDR) of Klebsiella pneumoniae from poultry farms in Blitar. Chicken cloacal swabs from 63 poultry farms (32 broilers and 31 layers) were taken randomly, using total samples 160 broilers and 155 layers. The collected swab samples were inoculated on MacConkey agar medium for isolation and identification. Single colony was isolated after primary positive cultures and identified by using the IMViC test and TSIA. 28 (8.88%) out of samples were found positive for Klebsiella pneumoniae. The antimicrobial confirmation test showed that 53.57% of the K. pneumoniae isolates were Multi-Drug Resistance (MDR) bacteria. The percentage of MDR bacteria against different antibiotics included ampicillin 75%, Erythromycin 42.86%, Tetracycline 35.72%, Sulfamethoxazole 32.14% and Streptomycin 21.4%. This study confirmed that the percentage of resistant isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae from 5 antimicrobial agents of broiler chicken are higher than layer chicken. The presence of multidrug-resistant bacteria is a threat to public health and livestock. The impact of these conditions leaves a limited treatment option as chicken farmers in Indonesia still using antibiotics without veterinarian supervision.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4642-4647
Number of pages6
JournalBiodiversitas
Volume21
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2020

Keywords

  • Antibiotic resistance
  • Klebsiella pneumoniae
  • MDR
  • Poultry farms
  • Public health

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