Application of rice husk as a carbon source for substitution of sensitizer and counter electrode material in dye-sensitized solar cells

T. Paramitha, D. A. Munika, D. R. Saputra, S. S. Nisa, A. Purwanto, A. Supriyanto, H. Widiyandari, H. K. Aliwarga

Research output: Contribution to journalConference articlepeer-review

Abstract

The third generation of solar cells is dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC). DSSC can convert solar energy into electrical energy. The main components of DSSC include working electrode, counter electrode, sensitizer, and electrolyte. Substitution of commercial chemicals for the sensitizer (N719) and the counter electrode (platinum) of DSSC will lower the cost of DSSC fabrication. This study focuses on Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Quantum Dots (N-CQDs) synthesized from rice husks as a sensitizer. Then, DSSC with sensitizer of N719 (Pt-1) and N-CQDs (Pt-2) were compared. Furthermore, the N-CQDs residue in solid carbon was used as the counter electrode material using different sensitizers N719 (C-1) and N-CQDs (C-2). Based on the results, the FTIR characterization of N-CQDs showed the functional groups N-H, O-H, C=O, and CN. The UV-VIS characterization of N-CQDs had absorbance in the wavelength range of 200-400 nm. Pt-2 has an efficiency value of 0.258%, Jsc of 2.188 mA/cm2 Voc of 0.6 volts, and FF of 0.20. C-2 has an efficiency of 0.0010%, Jsc of 0.042 mA/cm2 Voc of 0.131 volts, and FF of 0.17. This confirms that N-CQDs can be used as a sensitizer and counter electrode material, although the results are not as good as commercial chemicals.

Original languageEnglish
Article number012010
JournalJournal of Physics: Conference Series
Volume2696
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2024
Externally publishedYes
Event14th International Symposium on Modern Optics and Its Applications, ISMOA 2023 - Bandung, Indonesia
Duration: 1 Aug 20234 Aug 2023

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